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October 29, 2016 / Rae Spencer

Butterfly Mimics and a Publication Note

butterfly-oct-22

Red-spotted Purple (10/22/16)

On first glance, I thought the butterfly shown above was a late-flying Eastern Black Swallowtail.

swallowtail-june-23

Eastern Black Swallowtail (6/23/16)

After a closer look, I decided the unknown visitor might be a Pipevine Swallowtail. (I don’t have any photos of Pipevine Swallowtails because I’ve never seen one in person. Here’s a link with photos.) But how could it be any kind of swallowtail, without the characteristic “tails” on its hind wings?

Red-spotted Purple (10/22/16)

Red-spotted Purple (10/22/16)

As always, I turned to the internet for answers. Searching for “butterflies that look like Eastern Black Swallowtails” led me to the Swallowtail Butterfly Comparison page on a site called Butterflies at Home. There I discovered that my unknown butterfly is a Red-spotted Purple, which explains why it doesn’t have tails on its hind wings. It isn’t a swallowtail at all. Instead it belongs to the family of brush-footed butterflies. (As an aside, I’m now fascinated with name “brush-footed”.)

Red-spotted Purple

Red-spotted Purple (10/22/16)

But why do all of these butterflies look so similar? What is so special about a combination of blue highlights and reddish spots? Obviously the pattern carries some sort of selective advantage, something deeper than aesthetic appeal for camera-wielding writers.

Unknown Swallowtail July 25

Spicebush Swallowtail (7/25/12)

It seems that the story starts with Pipevine Swallowtails, which lay their eggs on the poisonous pipevine plant (also known as Dutchman’s Pipe.) As the caterpillars feed and grow, they ingest and store a toxin called aristolochic acid, which lingers in their bodies as the caterpillars mature into adults. So the butterflies, as well as all stages of the caterpillars, are poisonous. Even their eggs are poisonous.

All in all, it’s an elegant and effective defense against predators. So effective, in fact, that it conveys a measure of protection for any butterfly with black wings, blue highlights, and reddish spots. Selective advantage, indeed.

butterfly-oct-22

Red-spotted Purple (10/22/16)

Now, if only I could find a Pipevine Swallowtail to photograph…


For more information, check out a few of these articles:


Publication Note: On October 7, my poem “The Fire” posted at Autumn Sky Poetry Daily. Many thanks to editor Christine Klocek-Lim!

4 Comments

  1. The Smiling Pilgrim / Oct 30 2016 12:32 AM

    Absolutely amazing color on that blueish butterfly!

    • Rae Spencer / Oct 30 2016 2:44 PM

      Aren’t they beautiful? I’m obsessed with watching and photographing them. 🙂

  2. Sylvia Ismail / Oct 30 2016 3:02 PM

    You are very observant: very interesting piece about butterflies and the marvellous complexity of nature. I also enjoyed your poem: It brought back vivid memories of wood and coal fires in hearths I knew well as a child, from my parents’ house to my grandmother’s – fire is still right there at our core, even after millennia of evolution, isn’t it?

    • Rae Spencer / Oct 30 2016 3:36 PM

      We have gas heat in our house now, and it never feels as warm as our wood stove did. We have a fireplace, but it’s not the same. The fireplace is fun to watch, but seems to make the house colder when we use it. Some day I’ll have a wood stove again, just for the simple comfort of being well and truly warm in winter. 🙂

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